Advocacy matters: A personal story and call to action

Charities have long played a role in supporting and advocating for people when markets and governments fail. They have existed in Australian history since well before the welfare state and have continued to fill gaps either on behalf of government (with funding being directed from government to the third sector) or instead of government (with funding via other sources, such as philanthropy).It’s important for a stronger, equitable society that charities are able to continue to advocate for their “charitable purpose”.

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The politics of the problem: How to use Carol Bacchi's work

In 1991 Carol Bacchi comprehensively introduced poststructuralism and social constructionism to policy studies with her book Women, Policy and Politics: The Construction of Policy Problems. It detailed an approach called ‘What’s the problem represented to be?’ and offers a different way of conceptualizing and understanding policy. Whilst usual approaches tend to treat policy as axiomatic or self-evident, Bacchi’s challenges the privileging of all forms of expertise and knowledge. For Bacchi, approaches to policy studies are ‘inherently political’ and  need to be treated as such.

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Ethics in policy: how can public servants call out the ethical aspects of the issue at hand?

Kym Peake is secretary of the Victorian Department of Health and Human Services. She previously held senior executive roles in the Victorian Department of Premier and Cabinet, Department of Education and Early Childhood Development, and the Department of Prime Minister and Cabinet. This article is the text of a speech she gave on the ethical challenge of family violence, edited only for clarity by The Mandarin

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‘You don’t know what you’ve got ‘til it’s gone’: The implications of expanding the use of robots in care services

An ANZSOG-funded research project is exploring the increasing use of robots in care services to replace or complement the roles of humans. In this article, researchers Helen Dickinson, Nicole Carey, Catherine Smith and Gemma Carey explore some of the long-term implications for governments from the rise of robots.

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Can flexible work hurt your health?

In our first post of 2018 (by The Mandarin's David Donaldson and featuring ANZSOG research by Ellie Malbon and Gemma Carey), we look at two images of workplace flexibility - is it geared around benefits for the organisation, or for the individual? And what are the implications for employee health?

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